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Rainy Days and Sundays

12 Jun

http://imagecache.allposters.com/images/pic/DOGPOD/NK-CHILD~Child-in-the-Rain-Posters.jpg

The best sound in the world to wake up to is the sound of a gentle rain on the windows and rooftop of our home.
I love overcast days and carrying an umbrella down misty sidewalks.

My favorite days to wake up to are Sundays.
My heart beats a little quicker as I sneak around the house before anyone else has gotten out of bed… mentally and prayerfully preparing for the day of ministry in front of me.

So, it’s funny to me to think about how much I’m disappointed when I wake up and find these things happening at the same time.
Rainy days and Sundays frustrate me to no end.

I’ve yet to put my finger on why, but rainy days seem to impact our children’s ministry program attendance more than holidays, summer breaks or sporting events.  Having an open courtyard where our welcome tables and classrooms are located probably doesn’t help the situation… but I’m left wondering, does this happen everywhere?  Or is this a California trend?

After sending out a tweet on a drizzly Sunday morning, I began to see that this could be an issue that impacts more churches than I first would have guessed.  Quick replies from @KellykelKool and @PudgeHuckaby (who, btw, has a GREAT blog over at www.pudgehuckaby.com) leave me wondering, what impact does rainy weather have on your church programs…?

So, seriously, no lurking on this one… we want to hear from you!
To the comments section!

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4 Comments

Posted by on June 12, 2009 in Kidmin, Los Angeles

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

4 responses to “Rainy Days and Sundays

  1. Jill Nelson

    June 14, 2009 at 8:05 pm

    Try living up in Oregon! You’d think that with all the rain we see, it wouldn’t make a difference, but oh it does! With having no choice but to go out in rain five days a week for work or school, a strong tendency seems to be to just want to stay in on Sunday. My Early Childhood Director just moved up here from San Diego a year ago, and couldn’t believe that the rain actually affects things here. Seasonal Affected Depression is also very common up here with how little we see the sun 9 months out of the year. It always seems like we have a happier congregation once May hits.
    We’ve found that the best way to compete with the rain (besides having guys with large umbrellas escort people from their cars) is to make our ministry a can’t-miss event for the kids. I’ve had several parents come in on a Sunday morning and say to me, “Thanks a lot! We were going to just sleep in this morning until the kids insisted we couldn’t miss church.” Music to my ears 🙂

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  2. Anthony Prince

    June 15, 2009 at 7:35 am

    Jill!
    I wondered about the impact weather has on churches further up the coast.
    Thanks for sharing.
    I love the idea about umbrella escorts… two things:
    a) Is that a real thing your church does?
    2) Who provides oversight for that team? Children’s Ministry?

    I’d love to hear more about the role weather plays in your events and what you do to rally in spite of it!

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  3. Susan

    June 17, 2009 at 6:16 pm

    Here in VA in the spring, summer, & fall, the rain actually tends to increase our attendance! Rain means no baseball/soccer/softball and no trips to the river. You can see where everyone’s priorities are.In the colder months though, rain can mean a lower attendance.

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    • Anthony Prince

      June 17, 2009 at 8:37 pm

      I love an East Coast perspective on the topic…
      Thanks, Susan!
      (and, welcome to the blog!)

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