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Guest Post: The Price of Privilege

28 Jul

The following is a post from our Middle School intern, Kailyn King (@kailynking).  You can share your thoughts about the book, or questions about this post, by commenting below.

I have to say I was really excited to start this book. I’m not a parent, or a teenager anymore (granted only by a few months) but I have known and now know plenty of teens that fit the demographic of this book (including my previous self) and I was really interested to see what Dr. Levine had to say about privileged teens and their emotional problems. I have known all kinds of teens struggling with the challenges of growing up, but this is the first time that I have read a book specifically about the particular needs of teens growing up in affluence. I grew up in an affluent home in an affluent town and am now graduating from UCSD with many more affluent young people raised all over the state. This book didn’t trivialize these kid’s needs, or the challenges presented to their parents and never reduced the root of the problem to some sort of “poor rich kid” syndrome. Dr Levine was able to talk about some of the challenges of raising kids in tactful and honest way that called particular attention to the difficulties in raising kids in an environment where money is no object.

The chapter on the formation of “the healthy self” stood out to me as particularly relevant to what I have seen. With statements like “It is hard to develop an authentic self when there is constant pressure to adopt a socially facile, highly competitive, performance-oriented, unblemished “self ” that is promoted by omnipresent adults” (page 65) it was hard for me not to see a little bit of myself, and tons of other teens I grew up with being described to some extent. I know young adults who were so over scheduled as kids, so encouraged by parents and adults, so socially crafted that they get to graduation and honestly have no idea who they are. I have seen people I love go away to college and have no idea how to self regulate, how to make decisions like picking a major or class schedule for themselves. They become literally paralyzed with indecision and with lack of self awareness. Having seen this in action, Levine’s book becomes an important resource for me to understand how being raised in affluence may be a risk factor for emotional difficulties instead of being a buffer as has been suggested in most of the other sources I have read.

The next chapters of the book focus on different aspects of parenting that are affected by money and the kinds of societal norms that may emerge in areas where there is money. I won’t go into details about exactly what she covers, but I will say that I would strongly recommend giving this book a read. I think parents, prospective parents, people who work with teens or their parents could really use this book as a starting point (or a continuation of) taking a hard look at the effects of monetary comfort on their kids and teenagers. Levine is understanding and sensitive to the challenges parents face while still managing to get real about how important it is for parents to understand how what they do influences the emotional state of their kids. I know my parents fought hard to make sure to cultivate in me a sense of self and of personal ownership and responsibility and I so appreciate their hard work. I know it wasn’t easy for them to do but I have to say everything they did then is greatly appreciated by me now! This book seems like it would be a resource I would want to have if I were looking at the incredible challenge of raising kids.

I hope this was helpful, either in encouraging you to read this book or helping you decide it’s not for you.

 

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5 responses to “Guest Post: The Price of Privilege

  1. AmyFentonLee

    July 28, 2011 at 8:02 am

    Thank you Anthony & Kailyn for featuring this review. This is really helpful and relates to a big issue I feel like we deal with personally (in our own family). Keep the reviews coming! – Amy Fenton Lee

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    • Anthony Prince

      July 28, 2011 at 8:34 am

      Glad we could help, Amy! And… thanks for all that YOU do for the Kingdom. I probably pass on at least one of your posts each week to a parent or volunteer that needs to read the stuff you’re putting together on special needs ministry!

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  2. Wanda

    August 12, 2011 at 7:28 pm

    I had a child tell her discipler she didn’t have time to read her Bible because, “Monday I have piano lessons, Tuesday and Thursday I have soccer practice and Sat. are the games, Wednesday is Girl Scouts and every morning before school I go to gymnastics.”

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  3. MK @ Teach Sunday School

    August 22, 2011 at 11:06 am

    I haven’t read “The Price of Privilege” yet, but after reading this incredibly thought-provoking review, I know that I’m going to have to set aside some time to read the book. You did a great job of showing me exactly what the book is all about, and it seems as though it’s something that I’m going to have to check out—especially since I just picked up a teen youth ministry class.

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